Luca Dal Zilio

News


Why massive earthquakes menace the Himalayas


Nature highlights | January 2019

Devastating earthquakes have struck the Himalayan region in recent decades, and an analysis of quake dynamics explains why more "big ones" are probably on the way...

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Devastating quakes are priming the Himalaya for a mega-disaster


National Geographic | January 2019

Moderate earthquakes aren’t releasing enough stress along the region’s faults. They’re actually making it worse...

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Waiting for the complete rupture


ETH News | January 2019

Nepal was struck by an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8 in 2015, but the country may still face the threat of much stronger temblor. This is the conclusion reached by ETH researchers based on a new model that simulates physical processes of earthquake rupture between the Eurasian and Indian Plates...

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Major earthquakes could still devastate Nepal


Futurity | January 2019

An earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8 struck Nepal in 2015, and the country may still face the threat of much stronger quake, according to new research...

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Earthquakes in the Himalaya are bigger than in the Alps because tectonic plates collide faster


Geology page | December 2017

Earthquakes that happen in densely populated mountainous regions, such as the Himalaya, spell bigger earthquakes because of a fast tectonic-plate collision, according to a new study in Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Researchers from Geophysical Fluid Dynamics — ETH Zürich in Switzerland, say their findings give people a more complete view of the risk of earthquakes in mountainous regions...

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Earthquakes — Swiss study shines new light on the risks in the Alps


Le News | November 2017

A study by scientists at ETH Zurich, published on ScienceDirect on 15 November 2017, provides a powerful new way of looking at the risk of large earthquakes in the Alps, Apennines, Zagros and Himalaya mountain ranges....

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Subduction–driven Earth machine


Nature Geoscience | April 2018

In the 1960s, the concept of plate tectonics revolutionized the field of geoscience. This theory describes how Earth’s surface is a jigsaw of seven large tectonic plates and a variety of smaller ones that move slowly over time. Some of the most spectacular consequences of this motion are out there, right in front of our eyes: magnificent mountain ranges and immense oceans...

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Faster tectonic-plate collisions spell bigger earthquakes


Nature Highlights | November 2017

Big tremors are more likely in mountain ranges where plates grind together at high speed.....

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© Luca Dal Zilio. All rights reserved.

Outstanding Student Poster Award


European Geoscience Union | April 2019

The poster presented at EGU 2018 explores the conditions that could explain the bimodal seismicity (Mw 7 vs. Mw 8+ earthquakes) of large Himalayan earthquakes. His numerical experiments establish the dependence of earthquake rupture pattern on fault frictional properties and non-planar geometry of the Himalayan megathrust due to variations in stress distribution...

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Plate Tectonics and Great Earthquakes: 50 Years of Earth-Shaking Events, by Lynn R. Sykes


The Higher Education


This book is an essential insider’s guide to plate tectonics, earthquakes and their implications for society. It highlights the appalling reality of the threat to the growing international populations that are exposed to earthquakes, especially those concentrated in vulnerable megacities. Recent calamities such as the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster are simply foretastes of what is to come, unless decisive action is taken....

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Cross-Scale Modeling of Mountain Building and the Seismic Cycle:        From Alps to Himalaya


Springer Thesis

This book integrates a broad range of scientific disciplines, from geodynamics and tectonics to earthquake physics, geodesy and seismology. This holistic approach supports a detailed investigation of the deformation and seismicity associated with mountain building processes and fault activity in the Earth’s upper, brittle crust. New insights into these deformational processes on both earthquake cycle and geologic timescales are subsequently combined to improve our physical understanding of seismicity in mountain belts, which has a variety of potential applications in active tectonics studies and seismic hazard assessments...

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I come from Italy, a country that’s quite seismically active, but even if an earthquake happened a few years ago, people have no concept that it could happen again. They are always surprised when there’s an earthquake in the Alps or in the Apennines...

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